Washington Post columnist warns that Democrats’ “stagnation of words” doesn’t work

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Washington Post columnist Megan McArdle has dismissed the semantic debate over whether the United States is Officially in recession He warned Democrats that such “conflicting words” about the state of the economy were not an effective policy strategy.

In her Friday article entitled “Enough With” Is This A Recession? Chatter,” McCardle began by asking, “Are we in a recession? Does this matter?” She noted that “the preliminary report from the Bureau of Economic Analysis released Thursday shows that the economy contracted at an annualized pace of 0.9 percent in the second quarter, after a decline of 0.9 percent in the second quarter. 1.6 percent in the first quarter.

two consecutive quarters of negative GDP Growth has always been the technical definition of stagnation.

McArdle noted, “Thus, the class of critics launched into a dispute over whether or not this really represented a stagnation. As with everything else these days, the debate has (mostly) split along partisan lines and has become so fierce that Wikipedia has had to shut it down.” Entering slack periods to adjustments.”

President Biden has continued to insist that the United States is not in a recession.

President Biden has continued to insist that the United States is not in a recession.
(Getty Images)

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She identified both sides of the argument, “The right insists that, yes, we’re clearly in a recession. Which part of the ‘two quarters of negative GDP growth’ do you not understand? The left is pointing out that the responsible US metric actually depends on a more combination of complexity of pointers.

While McArdle suggested Spin coming from the Democrats She also acknowledged that the Biden White House was “not unreasonable” and “perhaps unreasonable to spend so much time arguing about” the definition of recession.

The columnist noted that “the Biden administration has spent a lot of energy trying to manage perceptions of the economy.” For example, she reminded readers, “Remember when inflation will be temporary?”

McArdle examined how talking points from the Biden administration did not shield President Biden from unpopularity: “Insisting that inflation was just a passing picture has not prevented consumers from noticing rising prices. Nor has it protected Biden acceptance rateswhich has regressed even as the administration continues to insist that all is well.”

A graphic showing inflationary measurements

A graphic showing inflationary measurements
(iStock)

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She acknowledged, “In terms of fairness, some would argue that when it comes to economics, perceptions can become reality.” “So, the theory goes, if you can prevent the media from Talking about the economyWe might all be better off.”

However, McArdle threw cold water on this idea: “You cannot send messages to people out of thinking that their economic conditions have worsened – or out of concern that this portends a bad future.” “So all the recycling efforts are likely to be futile,” she concluded.

“It is emblematic of a dangerous tendency on the left to believe that they can control reality by controlling the words we use to describe it,” the columnist added. Then I spoke in detail about the semantics of the “perpetual left-wing obsession”.

McArdle cited as one example: “It is the left that has put us in a vicious circle of endless euphemisms, turning the ‘illegal alien’ into an ‘illegal immigrant’ and from it into an ‘undocumented worker’ and so on.” Referring to the findings of linguist Stephen Pinker, she explains that “this doesn’t work: negative associations are related to the core concept, not the vocabulary.”

  February 21: Asylum seekers from Colombia, Venezuela and Cuba wait by the US border wall with Mexico, to be processed by CBP on February 21, 2022 in Yuma, Arizona, United States.  _____ US President Joe Biden talks about cutting energy prices at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, US, Thursday, March 31, 2022. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

February 21: Asylum seekers from Colombia, Venezuela and Cuba wait by the US border wall with Mexico, to be processed by CBP on February 21, 2022 in Yuma, Arizona, United States. _____ US President Joe Biden talks about cutting energy prices at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building in Washington, DC, US, Thursday, March 31, 2022. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

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“In the meantime, the persistent word alienates people who find the new terms strange and edgy, especially the less educated voters who are now bleeding Democrats,” she cautioned.

McCardle ended the column with this advice to Democrats, “Sure, you can’t really blame the Biden administration for trying to spice things up. But the rest of us — and Democrats in particular — would be better off if the left spent less time looking for better wording and more Time to find solutions.